San Remo Agreement Definition

The San Remo Conference was an international meeting of the High Council of the Allies after World War I, following the Paris Peace Conference held from 19 to 26 April 1920 at the Villa Devachan in Sanremo, Italy. The San Remo Resolution, adopted on April 25, 1920, determined the attribution of A-Class mandates to the management of three Ottoman territories in the Middle East, then unde defined: “Palestine”, “Syria” and “Mesopotamia”. The borders of the three territories should be defined “[later] by the main Allied powers,” so the status of outer areas such as Zor and Transjordan was unclear. At the San Remo conference (24-25 April), a Franco-British oil agreement was also reached by granting France a 25% share of Iraqi oil and favourable oil transport conditions, in return for the integration of Mosul into the British Mandate of Iraq. The decisions of the San Remo Conference confirmed the mandate of the London Conference. The San Remo Resolution, adopted on April 25, 1920, contained the Balfour Declaration of 1917. It and Article 22 of the League of Nations were the fundamental documents on which the British Mandate for Palestine was built. As part of the Balfour Declaration, the British government committed itself to promoting the establishment of a national home for the Jewish people in Palestine, without prejudice to the civil and religious rights of existing non-Jewish communities in Palestine or the rights and political status enjoyed by Jews in another country. [11] Article 22(4) of the Covenant described certain categories of the population as “communities that once belonged to the Turkish Empire” as “a stage of development where their existence as an independent nation can be provisionally recognized” (League_of_Nations_mandate #Types_of_mandates Class A mandates) and instructed the territories to “provide administrative advice and support until they are able to: Being alone”[12][13]. Britain has been mandated for Palestine and Iraq; France took control of Syria, including present-day Lebanon. After the Clemenceau-Lloyd-George Agreement of 1918, Britain and France also signed the San Remo Oil Agreement, under which Britain granted France a 25% share of Mosul`s oil production, the rest going to the United Kingdom[14] and France committed to deliver oil to the Mediterranean. The draft peace agreement signed at the conference with Turkey served as the basis for the 1920 Treaty of Sèvres. Germany was asked to fulfil its military and remedial obligations under the Treaty of Versailles and a resolution was adopted in favour of restoring trade with Russia.

[7] It was convened after the February Conference in London where the Allies met to discuss the division of the Ottoman Empire and the negotiation of agreements that were to become the Treaty of Sèvres. . . .